Saturday, March 11, 2017

"A Deus ex Machina for the Climate Change Problem"--my piece in American Conservative on the need for a more ambitious carbon-capture program.


Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Bollards and other Barriers: The Value of Passive Defenses in Homeland Security

The news is relentlessly sad: cars running over pedestrians, in Alabama, and in Louisiana--and that's just in the past few days. Whether the perpetrators are drunks, psychos, terrorists--or someone who has lethally lost his or her wits and shouldn't be driving--that doesn't make much difference at the moment when tons of steel comes crashing down on innocent people. 

In the wake of the truck-attack in Nice, France, I wrote about the value of passive defense for Breitbart last summer, here, and here.

The barriers could be static, active, or even self-aware.  But we need to do something.


Monday, February 27, 2017

Carbon Capture as a solution--perhaps THE solution--to Climate Change


This is a screen-grab from a video produced by Carbon Engineering, a British Columbia-based company which promises "industrial scale capture of CO2 from ambient air."  Bill Gates is an investor.

From a non-scientific political perspective, I have written about this idea in the past: In 2012, in 2014,  in 2015, in 2016, and then again in 2016. 



Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Sunday, October 09, 2011

Serious Medicine Crash--update


According to the Medical Innovation & Competitiveness Coalition, a unit of the National Venture Capital Association, medical investment is dramatically falling off

The survey found that U.S. venture capital firms have been decreasing their investment in biopharmaceutical and medical device companies over the past three years and expect to further curtail such investment in the future. Overall 39 percent of respondent firms have decreased their investments in   life sciences companies over the last three years and the same percentage expect to further decrease these investments over the next three years, some by greater than 30 percent. This is roughly twice the number of firms that have increased and/or expect to increase investment.

While 40 and 42 percent of firms expect to decrease investment in biopharmaceutical and medical device companies respectively, 42 and 54 percent expect to increase their investment in non-FDA regulated healthcare services and healthcare information technology companies respectively.

In another alarming sign, survey respondents expect to see significant investment decreases in companies fighting serious and highly prevalent conditions including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and neurological diseases.

“More than 100 million Americans suffer from diseases for which there are still no cures, or even meaningful therapeutic options. To conquer disease and relieve suffering, we must have a medical innovation pipeline that is as strong and robust as possible,” said Margaret Anderson, executive director, FasterCures. “Bringing critical therapies to market requires venture capital investment to spur a thriving life sciences industry as well as having a regulatory system that’s appropriately resourced and equipped to ensure innovation is translated to better health.” 

H/T: Manhattan Institute's Medical Progress Today